The Best Fly Line for Bass – Top 5 Models Ranked

Whenever you want to go off-roading, you are better off using the best off-road vehicle at your disposal. The same is true when you want to go skydiving; you had better use a reliable parachute. This is simply to say that choosing the best tool for the job is often a safe bet in anything you do. Fly fishing is a relaxing hobby and calls for the use of effective gear, such as the best fly fishing rod and the best fly line.

There are many different options when choosing a fly line but going with the first choice you see won't cut it. Taking the time to see what else is available and what works best for your kind of fly fishing is not only practical advice; it's prudent. With that being said, here are some of the best fly lines for bass fly fishing available on the market today.

Bass Fly Line Reviews

RIO Mainstream Bass Fly Line - Best Overall
  • Type: Floating
  • Weight: 8wt
  • Length: 80 feet

There are several good reasons why this RIO Mainstream Bass Fly Line is our best overall pick. It features a heavy front head, which means that you can throw big bass flies such as poppers or streamers with quite a bit of ease.

The line also features a heavier short head, which allows you to load your fly rod more quickly for more efficient casting. The front taper also effortlessly turns your bass flies over. Another excellent feature is that these lines have a low stretch core, which ensures that you get a better feel for your cast and increased line control. Since these lines have a low stretch core, you can easily jam your hooks into the bass.

This fly line from RIO Mainstream is designed to handle cold and warm water and can also be used to fish for trout and pike. This not only means that you can use the line all year round, but that you can use it for more than just bass fishing. Finally, this line has low memory, meaning that you are not likely to get lots of tangles when using it.

Pros

  • 80 ft. floating lineIdeal for other species too (trout and pike)
  • Features a heavy and short head which makes it ideal for turning over streamers
  • Works just as well in both warm and cold water
  • Features a low stretch core which allows for hard hook sets
  • Allows for quick fly rod loading
  • Doesn't tangle easily
  • Great for largemouth bass fishing

Cons

  • Doesn't have loops on either end
Scientific Anglers Sonar Sink 30 Bass Fly Line - Best Sink Tip Option
  • Type: Sink tip intermediate
  • Weight: 8 - 9 wt.
  • Length: 90 feet

One of the main reasons fishing is so much fun is that it almost always ends up being a game of cat and mouse between the fly angler and the fish. To find the fish, you have to consider where they might be hiding whenever you go fishing. In winter or summer, bass tend to go deeper underwater to keep warm or cool.

To find these fish, you need a fly line like this Scientific Anglers Sonar Sink 30 Bass Fly Line, which features a 30 ft. clear sink tip on one end. This means that you will be able to get your fly down to where the bass is hiding or feeding. Thanks to its clear tip, the bass won't know it's a trap.

Moreover, the line has a low stretch core and low memory, which means it's ideal for when you want to stop bass from tangling up the line in cover. Finally, since the line has a heavy head as well as a solid taper, you can easily load your fly rod and quickly turn over big bass flies at both long and short distances.

Pros

  • 90 ft. long line
  • Comes with a 30 ft. clear sink tip
  • Sink tip offers low visibility, ensuring that the bass doesn't get suspicious
  • Features both low core and low memory, which minimizes tangles

Cons

  • Relatively expensive

3. SF Fly Fishing Floating Line with Welded Loop - Best Welded Loop Option

SF Fly Fishing Floating Line with Welded Loop - Best Welded Loop Option
  • Type: Floating
  • Weight: 8 - 9 wt.
  • Length: 90 feet

This is a 90 ft. floating line that goes out of its way to make your life easier. The biggest difference between this SF Fly Fishing Floating Line with Welded Loop and most of the competition is based on the fact that it has welded loops on both ends.

While that isn't unique in the industry (many manufacturers do it), this line has a hint label telling you which end you need to reel in, ensuring that you don't confuse the weld ring or mistake it for the other end.

As an easy-to-float line that comes equipped with a special taper design, you can use this SF fly fishing floating line to fish in almost every condition, including even on the windiest of days.

The SF fly fishing floating line is made of premium material; the inside is made of woven PE wireline, and the outside of the line is covered by a layer of PVC, which makes this line extremely strong.

Finally, it comes in a host of practical color combinations that work well against the water, providing you with excellent visibility as a fly angler.

Pros

  • Made of premium material, making it strong and durable
  • Comes in a host of practical colors for excellent visibility
  • Easy float line that works well in most fishing conditions
  • Has weld rings on both ends

Cons

  • The different colors could be a disadvantage when fishing for skittish bass

4. Angler Dream Fly Fishing Line Kit - Best Kit Option

Angler Dream Fly Fishing Line Kit - Best Kit Option
  • Type: Floating
  • Weight: 5 - 9 wt.
  • Length: 100 feet

If you have been looking for a fly fishing line kit, you might want to give this Angler Dream Fly Fishing Line Kit a second look. It comes with a 100 ft. floating line that is excellent for beginners just getting started in bass fishing. This fly fishing line features a weight forward with a special taper design allowing for accurate casting in almost every condition.

The Angler Dream fly fishing line kit also comes with a braided backing line with a low friction coefficient, minimizing how much wear and tear is transferred to your guides. This kind of line is perfect for when you are fighting a speed fish that doesn't tire out easily. Finally, the kit also has nylon leaders that work well when casting streamers and dry flies.

Pros

  • Comes as a kit with a fly line, a braided backing line, and nylon leaders
  • Fly line is strong and features a special taper design
  • It's accurateIdeal for beginners
  • Relatively affordable
  • You get a host of weight options

Cons

  • Easy to tangle and knot up if you aren't careful
  • Not on a spool, making it harder to put on reel

5. Piscifun Sword Fly Fishing Line - Best Versatile Option

Piscifun Sword Fly Fishing Line - Best Versatile Option
  • Type: Floating
  • Weight: 8 wt.
  • Length: 100 feet

Designed for trout fishing, this Piscifun Sword Fly Fishing Line works well for bass and pike. It's by far one of the most versatile lines on this list. The manufacturers intended this line to be used by both experts and beginners alike. It has a bigger diameter and a longer head, making it a dream to cast for most anglers.

Furthermore, this Piscifun Sword fly fishing line features a braided core and low memory, which means it doesn't tangle very easily, making it quite easy to use.

However, one of the best features is the fact that the line has integrated slickness additives throughout its PVC material. This provides the line with much-needed lubrication, ensuring that you get the best performance, durability, and distance when you cast.

Finally, it has welded loops that make the leader attachment a breeze.

Pros

  • Extremely versatile line
  • Works well for both experts and beginners
  • Features integrated slickness additive for lubrication
  • Have welded loops
  • Comes in 7 different colors

Cons

  • It's only available as a floating line

Factors to Consider When Buying a Fly Line for Bass

As you can imagine, there are dozens of fly fishing lines for bass available on the market today. Each one of these options has its advantages and disadvantages. If you are going to find the best fly line for bass fishing, there are certain factors to consider. Here are some of the most important aspects to consider.

Fly Choice

Fly fishing for bass calls for the use of more than just one piece of fishing gear. That being said, one of the most important factors to consider before you buy a fly fishing line for bass is the kind of fly you are going to use. And to choose the best fly for bass, you first have to understand how bass behave:

They tend to feed in shallow water or water with lots of structures. You might not need to throw out a sinking line or sinking fly. This, in turn, means that you would be best served using a weighted forward floating line.

Bass also like ambushing their prey, which calls for larger flies. The best approach is to throw a large fly into tight cover. This calls for a fly line with a compact head and a short front taper.

In some cases, you will go fishing in windy conditions, which means you may want to use a heavy line.

Fishing Environments

While bass tend to feed in shallow water, they aren't only found in shallow water. Sometimes, bass go deep underwater to keep warm or cool. In these cases, your best bet would be to fish around submerged structures, which might not be very easy to reach without using a sinking line.

When choosing a fly line for this kind of fishing, you need to consider the depth at which the bass or the structure around which they would be feeding can be found. If the structure is around 10 feet deep, you should consider using an intermediate fly line.

On the other hand, if you are concerned that the structure or the fish might be deeper still, using a full sinking line might be the better option.

Water Body Type

The body of water you will be fishing also has a lot to do with determining the kind of fly line you should use. There's a big difference between fishing for bass in a lake where you are likely to see more success by throwing out a sinking line and fishing in a river where you might need to throw longer casts as well as make more delicate presentations.

Finally, there are factors such as color, price, and material. If you are going to be fishing in extremely busy waters, you might want to buy brightly colored lines just so that they're visible to other anglers as well as yourself. The material from which the line is made determines how easy it is to cast and its durability after continued use.

FAQ's

Still have questions about the best fly line for bass? Read on for more valuable information.

What is the best color line for bass fishing?

Bass tend to have good color vision when looking at colors that fall under the medium to light red range. They are also quite good at spotting yellow greens and red-orange. Your best bet is to use lines that fall under blue or dark green because that's where their color vision is weakest.

Must I choose a low-stretch line?

While you don't have to choose a low stretch line, it's important to consider that bass tend to have very hard mouths, and as such, you will have to exert a lot of energy to set that hook. Low stretch lines come in real handy here.

Can bass see braided lines?

Yes, fish can easily see braided lines, even though they tend to be quite thin. Monofilament lines are not quite as visible.

With the right tools, bass fishing can be a lot of fun. These fly fishing lines for bass are an excellent way to stock up on the right tools.

Looking for more product reviews? Check out our Buyer's Guide to the Best Fly Fishing Gear.

About the author

Ken is an avid fisherman of 40+ years who loves to explore and find new places to fish. He created DIY Fly Fishing to help you do the same.

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